How to make a pair of pants for your doll

Step 1: Select a suitable fabric type for pants. Lay your doll on a piece of the fabric that has been folded. You do not need a pattern to make pants for a doll. Get a piece of fabric that is long and wide enough to wrap around your doll’s legs. Fold the fabric in half. Place your doll so that her legs are centered over the fabric. Make sure that the print sides of the fabric are facing each other.

Step 2: Trace around the edges of your doll’s legs with a pen, pencil, or piece of chalk. Trace closer or further from the edges of her legs to determine the length and width of the pants, and stop tracing at the point where you want the pants to end on the doll.

To make fitted pants, trace 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) from the edges of the doll’s legs.

To make loose fitting pants, trace 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the doll’s legs.

To make baggy pants, trace 2 inches (5.1 cm) from the doll’s legs.

For full-length pants, stop tracing at the ankles.

For capris or for shorts, stop tracing higher up.

Step 3: Cut out the pieces. When having finished tracing the pants, please remove the doll from the fabric. Keep the fabric folded and cut along the lines with a sharp pair of scissors. Don’t separate the 2 pieces that have been cut out because you will need to sew or glue them together.

Step 4: Sew or glue the 2 pieces together by using a needle and thread or a sewing machine. You should sew a straight stitch about 0.25 inches (0.64 cm) from the inner and outer edges of the pant legs. Remember to keep the non-print sides of the fabric facing out.

If you use glue, let it dry overnight.

Step 5: Turn the pants inside out so that the seams will be hidden and the print will be visible.

When the pants are right side out, try them on your doll.

 

How to make a wrap skirt for your doll

Making clothes for your doll is quite interesting and not so difficult. You can make a dress, a skirt, or a pair of pants for your doll. All it requires is scrap fabric and some other basic craft supplies. Now, let’s start designing a wrap skirt for her!

Step 1: Select a suitable fabric type that will not fray, such as felt. Then, lay the doll on the fabric and mark the fabric. The fabric should be wide enough to fit the doll and overlap by about 3 cm. Cut the fabric so that it is as long as you want the skirt to be. Mark the fabric to indicate this length and then turn the doll centered on the fabric between these marks. Mark the fabric where you want the skirt to begin and end on the doll.

Step 2: Cut out a rectangle of fabric using the marks. Connect the marks in the rectangle with a piece of chalk and use a pair of sharp scissors to cut along these lines. This rectangular piece will be your fabric for the skirt.

Step 3: Cut a strip of fabric to secure the skirt. The strip should be as long as the width of your rectangle so that you can wrap the strip around the doll’s waist multiple times.

Step 4: Wrap the rectangle around the doll’s waist and lay your doll in the center of the rectangle with the top of the long edge about 1.3 cm above your doll’s waistline. Then, wrap the rectangle around her waist and legs so that it is tight to create the skirt. Just make sure that the ends overlap by at least 2.7 cm.

To make a pencil skirt, wrap the fabric around the doll tightly.

To make a full flowing skirt, do a loose wrap.

To make an A-line skirt, wrap the fabric so it is tighter at the top than at the bottom.

Step 5: Secure the skirt with a strip of fabric. When the skirt is fitted with your doll, take the strip of fabric and wrap it tightly around the doll’s waist a few times. Tie a knot or a bow to secure the skirt.

Let’s hear it for the boy!

In the doll making world, the guys are under appreciated. First off, there are fewer male doll artists. Those who do create dolls are excellent. Then there are fewer male characters produced. I can tell you from experience and comparing notes with my peers, that the male dolls don’t sell as well. Even when part of a pair. I can’t explain it really. Less glamour than their female counter parts?
Here’s a new cloth doll pattern by Linda Walsh. Linda’s patterns always come with a complete story for each doll. Peter here is no exception. Dressed in Colonial style with those big brown eyes, who could resist this guy? You can read his full story on Doll Street Dreamers.