Tennis Star Naomi Osaka Gets Her Own Barbie Doll

 

Being a tennis star with the world No. 1 spot, two grand slam titles, and recently Naomi Osaka has been honored by Barbie.

It’s to recognize the 21-year-old’s win at the 2018 US Open as well as her second consecutive grand slam title at the 2019 Australian Open that helped Osaka rise from world No. 72 to No. 1 – becoming the first Asian to hold the position.

The announcement that Naomi Osaka is to be celebrated with her own Barbie doll comes when toy manufacturer Mattel marks the iconic brand’s 60th birthday while March 8 is also International Women’s Day.

Osaka, whose father is from Haiti and mother is Japanese, tweeted earlier this week that she was proud of being considered as an influential female figure to young children.

She said: “Recently a lot of parents have been coming up to me and telling me that their kids look up to me, those words literally blew me away. I was honestly so shocked and felt this huge responsibility because I remember how important my role models are.”

“Fast forward a few days and I’m here at Indian Wells, I see all these kids that look so happy to see me and they ask for pictures and autographs … Honestly I wanted to cry because my heart feels so full in these moments and I realize that it isn’t just about tennis, it’s about inspiring the next generation.”

She also added: “Honored to be selected as a Barbie Role Model to help inspire the next generation of girls,” alongside a hashtag, “You can be anything.”

Kristina Vogel

Naomi Osaka is not alone in having the inspiring efforts that are celebrated by Barbie.

Olympic gold medal-winning cyclist Kristina Vogel has also been commemorated by Barbie, with her doll sitting in a wheelchair.

“As a brand, we can elevate the conversation around physical disabilities by including them into our fashion doll line to further showcase a multi-dimensional view of beauty and fashion,” said Mattel last month.

How to make doll hair (part 1)

When making your own doll, the question will arise: what to do for her hair? The methods and styles of hair are various but there is an overview of the most widely used styles of doll hair. I hope it can help you find the right direction when creating a handmade natural doll.

Firstly, I want to confirm that I mainly use the natural fibers to create doll hair because they are more sustainable for me to use. However, using which kind of materials is totally up to you.

When choosing what kind of hair to make for your doll, you should consider these things:

  1. Is the doll you are creating a toy for a child?

If yes, consider what their age is and what kind of doll play they engage in? For the small children under 7-year-old, I only recommend yarn hair for their doll, whether string-attached or a crochet mohair wig.

  1. Age appropriateness

If your doll is for a bigger child, for example, the age appropriateness of 7+, I think that you will have more difficulties in deciding the styles and especially the length of the doll’s hair.

  1. Art dolls

If you are creating an art doll, certainly your creativity and use of materials can soar. However, I think a practical aspect to the creation of your doll is necessary and important.

Though many art dolls are created as something to be admired and appreciated, we are talking about the dolls which can be manipulated by their owners. Their hair can be styled, played with, and possibly washed. As a result, you have to consider the tear and wear, which the style you choose to give your doll’s hair will get.

Once you have decided the end-recipient for your doll, you can consider the hairstyle which is most suitable for their personality.

 

Fairy tales come true!

Wow! It has been a busy few weeks. You may have noticed my absence from the blogosphere. Moving house has taken up much of my time and I am heartily sick of boxes by now! I can’t wait to pack the last empty one into the recycling pile.

Life has not been all about moving. I have also been teaching. The Canadian Embroiderer’s Association held their annual conference in Ottawa and I was invited to teach there. I had a fun time with my great group of students!  It was like a holiday in the midst of all that’s been going on lately. To dip back into my wools and show people the joys of needle felting.
The class was called Fairy Tale Felt Folks. We had two days to get all the wonderful characters to emerge and progress to being finished. I’m happy to report that nearly all of the pieces were finished. That left everyone with a good sense of accomplishment. Me too! It didn’t take long before the students opted to stay in the classroom over break times and keep working. I love it when people get keen right away!
So here are the results. My own character was Puck, but while he made a great demo piece, he has yet to be finished!
We had a couple of Puss In Boots, and Crooked Men, some mythical figures and loads of imagination!

Let’s hear it for the boy!

In the doll making world, the guys are under appreciated. First off, there are fewer male doll artists. Those who do create dolls are excellent. Then there are fewer male characters produced. I can tell you from experience and comparing notes with my peers, that the male dolls don’t sell as well. Even when part of a pair. I can’t explain it really. Less glamour than their female counter parts?
Here’s a new cloth doll pattern by Linda Walsh. Linda’s patterns always come with a complete story for each doll. Peter here is no exception. Dressed in Colonial style with those big brown eyes, who could resist this guy? You can read his full story on Doll Street Dreamers.