How to make Brushed Mohair Wig for dolls

If you have decided the recipient for your dolls’ hair, you can consider the hairstyle which is most suitable for their personality. Here is the instruction to make Brushed Mohair Wig style for your dolls.

When you choose the mohair style, there are two things you must consider: whether to use the bouclé mohair which gives your doll a more curly look or to use the long-staple mohair which creates the fluffy cap for her.

If you choose the fluffy cap, you will create a “hat” that fits your doll quite snuggly. There are two ways you can choose to do this: knit it or crochet it,.

I usually crochet the caps, but other doll makers may choose to knit them with the same results. Then you can brush it with a wire pet/comb brush to tease the mohair fibers from the nylon binding, that can create the hairy halo.

Another method is to crochet each stitch and pull the mohair fiber to the other side of your doll’s cap when you go along. You don’t have to brush your doll’s hair with a wire comb and in my opinion, this method creates the fluffiest wigs ever. This is such a beautiful way to add hair to your doll. It is both practical and playful because when time passes by, your doll’s hair will mat but you can easily tease it again and revive the cap.

The fact that the doll’s ages in appearance as time goes by is one of the most useful aspects of creating this hairstyle for dolls. The doll is not static and frozen in time, especially with a plastic doll, it takes ages and life experience along with you or your child.

To make suitable mohair yarn, you should abstain from using mohair meant for knitting. The staple is not long enough to properly cover the doll’s head, so stick to mohair yarn which is specifically created for doll making.

I highly recommend Dolly Mo and/or Wild Brushable as these yarns were created and designed by doll makers themselves.

You can find them online here: Mohair Yarns. There are several Canada and US suppliers as well: Reggie’s Dolls in the USA and Bear Dance Crafts in Canada.

How to make doll hair (part 1)

When making your own doll, the question will arise: what to do for her hair? The methods and styles of hair are various but there is an overview of the most widely used styles of doll hair. I hope it can help you find the right direction when creating a handmade natural doll.

Firstly, I want to confirm that I mainly use the natural fibers to create doll hair because they are more sustainable for me to use. However, using which kind of materials is totally up to you.

When choosing what kind of hair to make for your doll, you should consider these things:

  1. Is the doll you are creating a toy for a child?

If yes, consider what their age is and what kind of doll play they engage in? For the small children under 7-year-old, I only recommend yarn hair for their doll, whether string-attached or a crochet mohair wig.

  1. Age appropriateness

If your doll is for a bigger child, for example, the age appropriateness of 7+, I think that you will have more difficulties in deciding the styles and especially the length of the doll’s hair.

  1. Art dolls

If you are creating an art doll, certainly your creativity and use of materials can soar. However, I think a practical aspect to the creation of your doll is necessary and important.

Though many art dolls are created as something to be admired and appreciated, we are talking about the dolls which can be manipulated by their owners. Their hair can be styled, played with, and possibly washed. As a result, you have to consider the tear and wear, which the style you choose to give your doll’s hair will get.

Once you have decided the end-recipient for your doll, you can consider the hairstyle which is most suitable for their personality.

 

How to make a pair of pants for your doll

Step 1: Select a suitable fabric type for pants. Lay your doll on a piece of the fabric that has been folded. You do not need a pattern to make pants for a doll. Get a piece of fabric that is long and wide enough to wrap around your doll’s legs. Fold the fabric in half. Place your doll so that her legs are centered over the fabric. Make sure that the print sides of the fabric are facing each other.

Step 2: Trace around the edges of your doll’s legs with a pen, pencil, or piece of chalk. Trace closer or further from the edges of her legs to determine the length and width of the pants, and stop tracing at the point where you want the pants to end on the doll.

To make fitted pants, trace 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) from the edges of the doll’s legs.

To make loose fitting pants, trace 1 inch (2.5 cm) from the doll’s legs.

To make baggy pants, trace 2 inches (5.1 cm) from the doll’s legs.

For full-length pants, stop tracing at the ankles.

For capris or for shorts, stop tracing higher up.

Step 3: Cut out the pieces. When having finished tracing the pants, please remove the doll from the fabric. Keep the fabric folded and cut along the lines with a sharp pair of scissors. Don’t separate the 2 pieces that have been cut out because you will need to sew or glue them together.

Step 4: Sew or glue the 2 pieces together by using a needle and thread or a sewing machine. You should sew a straight stitch about 0.25 inches (0.64 cm) from the inner and outer edges of the pant legs. Remember to keep the non-print sides of the fabric facing out.

If you use glue, let it dry overnight.

Step 5: Turn the pants inside out so that the seams will be hidden and the print will be visible.

When the pants are right side out, try them on your doll.

 

How to make a wrap skirt for your doll

Making clothes for your doll is quite interesting and not so difficult. You can make a dress, a skirt, or a pair of pants for your doll. All it requires is scrap fabric and some other basic craft supplies. Now, let’s start designing a wrap skirt for her!

Step 1: Select a suitable fabric type that will not fray, such as felt. Then, lay the doll on the fabric and mark the fabric. The fabric should be wide enough to fit the doll and overlap by about 3 cm. Cut the fabric so that it is as long as you want the skirt to be. Mark the fabric to indicate this length and then turn the doll centered on the fabric between these marks. Mark the fabric where you want the skirt to begin and end on the doll.

Step 2: Cut out a rectangle of fabric using the marks. Connect the marks in the rectangle with a piece of chalk and use a pair of sharp scissors to cut along these lines. This rectangular piece will be your fabric for the skirt.

Step 3: Cut a strip of fabric to secure the skirt. The strip should be as long as the width of your rectangle so that you can wrap the strip around the doll’s waist multiple times.

Step 4: Wrap the rectangle around the doll’s waist and lay your doll in the center of the rectangle with the top of the long edge about 1.3 cm above your doll’s waistline. Then, wrap the rectangle around her waist and legs so that it is tight to create the skirt. Just make sure that the ends overlap by at least 2.7 cm.

To make a pencil skirt, wrap the fabric around the doll tightly.

To make a full flowing skirt, do a loose wrap.

To make an A-line skirt, wrap the fabric so it is tighter at the top than at the bottom.

Step 5: Secure the skirt with a strip of fabric. When the skirt is fitted with your doll, take the strip of fabric and wrap it tightly around the doll’s waist a few times. Tie a knot or a bow to secure the skirt.

A successful show!

A big thank you to everyone who came to our Art and Tea in the Garden last Saturday. It was a fabulous day all round: perfect weather, perfect food and tea, wonderful friends dropping by and new people to meet! I was surrounded by inspiration and the  warmth of friendship all day. How perfect is that?

To me, these events are a little holiday. A chance to just be an artist for a whole day, to be in the company of other artists, with time to talk; it gets the creative juices going. I look at what I’ve brought to offer and ideas come. “Maybe I could try this, or make that.” I have to keep notes, so I can use them for my next show. That will be FiberFest in Almonte this September.
Since the move had absorbed so much of life, I haven’t been to my creativity table much. But that will change!  My storage closet has begun to take shape. I am categorizing and sorting my stash. My aim is to have the categories well defined. For the stuff that must remin in boxes a bit longer, I plan to get it all out, take a photo and paste it on the box. It’s the best way to keep a visual inventory that I know!
On to the next show! See you there!

Fairy tales come true!

Wow! It has been a busy few weeks. You may have noticed my absence from the blogosphere. Moving house has taken up much of my time and I am heartily sick of boxes by now! I can’t wait to pack the last empty one into the recycling pile.

Life has not been all about moving. I have also been teaching. The Canadian Embroiderer’s Association held their annual conference in Ottawa and I was invited to teach there. I had a fun time with my great group of students!  It was like a holiday in the midst of all that’s been going on lately. To dip back into my wools and show people the joys of needle felting.
The class was called Fairy Tale Felt Folks. We had two days to get all the wonderful characters to emerge and progress to being finished. I’m happy to report that nearly all of the pieces were finished. That left everyone with a good sense of accomplishment. Me too! It didn’t take long before the students opted to stay in the classroom over break times and keep working. I love it when people get keen right away!
So here are the results. My own character was Puck, but while he made a great demo piece, he has yet to be finished!
We had a couple of Puss In Boots, and Crooked Men, some mythical figures and loads of imagination!