Bad shopping habits you need to fix right now (part 2)

3. Shopping Because of Boredom

If you have nothing to do on your lunch break, why not pop over to the mall? A free Friday night would be perfect for hitting up shops and restaurants downtown. Sound familiar? If so, you may be treating shopping as a hobby or pastime rather than a necessity. Shopping out of boredom – both in-store and online – can cause you to overspend and purchase items you don’t need, both busting your budget and cluttering your home.

Tips to Fix: Prevent boredom by looking into other free activities you can do when you have a spare hour or two. Catch up on your favorite podcast, go for a run, call up a friend for coffee, or read a book. By having a few alternatives in place, the mall won’t be the only place to turn when you’re bored.

4. Impulse Shopping

We all know impulse shopping is wrong – it causes you to spend outside of your budget. However, stopping yourself from making those buys is easier said than done. When you’re walking past a store and see a jacket you can’t live without, it’s very easy to whip out your credit card and walk out with exactly what you want.

Fast Fix: By knowing what clothing items you already have in your closet and acknowledging what triggers your shopping, you can avoid blowing your budget on unplanned purchases. Check out these tips:

  • Know Your Personal Inventory. By keeping track of what you own, you won’t be swayed by a new pencil skirt when you already have a great one at home.
  • Check Your Triggers. Perhaps you have a specific store that lulls you to buy over and over, or you like making purchases when perusing online auction sites. Identify your triggers and you can work to avoid them.
  • Walk Away. This is the ultimate in impulse-buy prevention. Even if you’re totally in love with something, walk away for a day. If you find yourself still thinking about that item, see where your budget might allow for the purchase before you take the plunge.

Impulse shopping can definitely derail the best-laid budget plans, so be on the lookout for anything that entices you to make an unplanned purchase.

Online sports platform DAZN to become the first global sports streaming platform

Online sports platform DAZN is going to greatly expand as becoming the first global live sports streaming service in the world.

The London-based platform has been already available in nine countries in the world, including the US, Japan, and Canada, where it shows boxing and a lineup of some other sports.

However, it is to launch within the spring in additional 200 territories where it will concentrate solely on boxing, consistent with a press release published on Monday.

The platform will have deals with promotion companies such as wonder boy, which boasts the power of middleweight Mexican counterpuncher Canelo Alvarez.

DAZN also has deals with Matchroom Boxing USA with GGG Promotions, owned by Kazakhstani ex-middleweight champ Gennady Golovkin and two-time unified heavyweight champion Anthony Joshua of England on its books.

The first fight that is going to be available across the markets of DAZN on May 2 will feature the world champion in 4 different weight categories Alvarez, against an announced opponent.

According to a source on the brink of the project, the subscription price is going to be between US$5 and US$15 per month, counting on the market.

DAZN with about 8 million subscribers also has rights to the NFL in Canada and has acquired Champions League football in Germany, starting with the 2021-2022 season.

The company is majority-owned by the US-based multinational industrial group Access Industries, which also controls general sports site Sporting News and football news website Goals.com.

Considered as one of the key growth drivers in streaming, live sports at a world level have faced two key pitfalls thus far.

The first concerns streaming rights, which are usually sold country by country rather than globally.

The second is tied to the necessity for a platform that’s technically capable of supporting many connections to one live event.

Multiple platforms have already experienced failures during the football World Cup – notably the US televised sports giant ESPN and therefore the BBC.